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For A Mother Who Needs Some Alone Time, Gorilla Works As A Babysitter

Being a mother is undoubtedly taxing, and Gutangara, a mountain gorilla in Rwanda’s Virunga Mountains, demonstrates that even animal moms want a rest. Fortunately, another adolescent gorilla named Ubukombe is eager to babysit for these stressed-out mums.

The Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund’s communications expert, Donna Gorman, told The Dodo:

“Ubukombe never misses a chance to volunteer to look after the group’s kids, and her babysitting relieves moms of their responsibilities.”

Credit: THE DIAN FOSSEY GORILLA FUND

Ubukombe was spotted caring for a baby while Gutangara, an exhausted mother, had a rest. Gutangara is a member of the Pablo Group, a historical group that the Fossey Fund has been monitoring since 1993.

Gutaranga is the most successful gorilla, with seven live progeny, and he constantly appears to have his hands full. Ubukombe, a volunteer, is a huge supporter of the Gutangara family.

Ubukombe is not only assisting moms, but she is also assisting in the conservation of her species. According to a recent census, just 1,063 mountain gorillas remain. The infant develops his independence regardless of how long he is apart from his mother.

Here is a cute video of Ubukombe taking care of babies:

Donna added:

“Nanny work is seen in gorillas, although it is seen more frequently in certain groups than others, and in some gorillas than others.”

Ubukombe is an incredible gorilla; at just 6 years old, she is an expert at caring for infants.

Donna continued, ”

“Despite her early age, we regularly observe Ubukombe grooming and cuddling the newborns in the group,” says the narrator.

Credit: THE DIAN FOSSEY GORILLA FUND

Donna said:

“The sooner the infant is self-sufficient, the sooner the mother will be able to give birth again.” A mother gorilla generally takes three and a half to four years to wean her kid, and she does not become pregnant during this period.

Mountain gorillas are no longer on the verge of extinction because to conservation initiatives. They might flourish much more with assistance like Ubukombe’s.

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